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University of Connecticut College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Dairy Bar

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. How many years has the Dairy Bar been open?
  2. When did the Dairy Bar move to its current location?
  3. Does the Dairy Bar really make all of its dairy products from UConn milk?
  4. Does the Dairy Bar sell milk?
  5. Are growth hormones given to UConn dairy cows?
  6. What products does the Dairy Bar have for sale?
  7. What are some serving suggestions for the varieties of Dairy Bar cheese?
  8. Why doesn't the Dairy Bar post the prices of the UConn Poultry Farm eggs?
  9. Why are there different colored eggs, like white, brown, tan, and green?
  10. Why isn't there a sell by date on the UConn Poultry Farm egg packaging?
  11. Is the Dairy Bar open year-round?
  12. Can I apply to work at the Dairy Bar?
  13. How can I contact the Dairy Bar staff?
  14. How do I get to the Dairy Bar?
  15. What is the history of the UConn Dairy Bar?
  16. Can I tour the animal barns?
  17. What will visitors see at the animal barns?
  18. I would like to schedule a field trip to UConn and get ice cream at the Dairy Bar, what do I need to know?
  19. Can I schedule a tour of the creamery?
  20. How does the Dairy Bar handle food allergens?
  21. Where is the UConn Co-Op?
  22. How did the husky dog mascot get the name "Jonathan"?

Q 1: How many years has the Dairy Bar been open?

The UConn Dairy Bar, or Dairy Product Salesroom as it was originally named, opened sometime between 1953 and 1954 to sell dairy products that were manufactured by the Creamery.

Q 2: When did the Dairy Bar move to its current location?

It moved to its new, larger quarters in the George White building on November 28, 1998. The Animal Science building is named after George Cleveland White who served as a Professor of Dairy Husbandry at UConn from 1914 to 1944. He taught Milk Production, Cattle Judging, Animal Nutrition, and Herd Improvement classes.

Q 3: Does the Dairy Bar really make all of its dairy products from UConn milk?

Yes! Our average milk pick up is 200 gallons. We proudly use the Kellogg Dairy Center milk to manufacture all of our ice cream and cheese. On any given day, the KDC milks an average of 90-100 dairy cows, three times a day per cow! The Dairy Bar uses a fraction of the milk that the UConn cows produce, and the rest is picked up by a milk tanker truck from a farmer owned cooperative and taken to a dairy plant in West Springfield, MA.

Q 4: Does the Dairy Bar sell milk?

No, we do not process fluid milk due to equipment and licensing limitations. We manufacture premium hard ice cream and a variety of cheeses. Click here for our menu

Q 5: Are growth hormones given to UConn dairy cows?

No, the Kellogg Dairy Center does not give growth hormones to the cows.

Q 6: What products does the Dairy Bar have for sale?

  • Cones, Sundaes, Cookie Sandwiches, Milkshakes, Ice Cream Sodas, Ice Cream Floats, and half gallons of ice cream- flavor availability varies.
  • Uconn Poultry Farm Fresh Eggs, in a variety of sizes. Stop in to pick up a dozen or a flat!
  • We also offer a variety of cheeses made in our creamery. Please call for currently available varieties.
  • Gift certificates available for any dollar value - great gift for alumni and especially for UConn students!
  • Custom made Ice Cream cakes for any occasion with 48 hours advance notice. Please call us for more information.

Click here for a preview of some of the cakes we have made.

Q 7: What are some serving suggestions for the varieties of Dairy Bar cheese?

The Dairy Bar makes a variety of cheeses and we sell which ever varieties are currently available. The variety of cheeses made at the Dairy Bar include: mild, medium, and sharp cheddar cheese; white cheddar curd; juustoleipa cheese; jalapeño juustoleipa cheese; and white cheese crumbles.

Mild, medium, and sharp cheddar cheese are delicious when eaten plain, with crackers or sliced on a sandwich, and in your favorite mac n' cheese recipe!

White cheddar curd is also delicious when eaten plain, but is very good when melted on a cracker. When the white cheddar curd is melted, the buttery flavor is delightfully enhanced! It is often used as an ingredient in "poutain", which are actually French fries with cheese curds covered with brown gravy.

Juustoleipa cheese is a Finnish-style bread cheese that is an excellent stand-alone cheese, for example served as an appetizer. It is pronounced "HOO-stah-lee-pah" or "you-stoy-lay-PA", and its name means "bread cheese" in Finnish because it looks like a slice of bread, not because you should eat it with bread! It is best when served warm and it holds its shape very well. It is very tasty when heated under the broiler, in the toaster or convection oven, and on the grill where the outside can crisp up a bit. In a pinch, the microwave will work; it will just have a more rubbery than crispy texture. This variety of cheese is excellent if drizzled with maple syrup, served with jam or salsa, and even dipped in your morning coffee!

Jalapeño juustoleipa will have similar serving suggestions as the plain juustoleipa- minus the sweet stuff- just with a spicy kick! Try it toasted over some pita chips with salsa!

White cheese crumbles (with or without jalapeños) are the curd of the juustoleipa cheese and this variety of cheese can be served in an omelet or frittata, sprinkled over nachos or on your favorite salad!

Q 8: Why doesn't the Dairy Bar post the prices of the UConn Poultry Farm eggs?

Egg prices are not posted due to the constant fluctuation of egg sizes available for sale, depending on what stage of production the chickens are in.

Chickens start out at a young age with smaller eggs and the eggs will increase in size with age. Market fluctuations also affect the prices of dozens and flats. Customers will get the most accurate information by asking one of the Dairy Bar staff members.

Q 9: Why are there different colored eggs, like white, brown, tan, and green?

Egg color is determined by the breed of chicken. White leghorns lay white eggs and Brown Leghorns also lay white eggs even though their feathers are very brown overall. An interesting fact is that you can determine whether a chicken lays a white egg by the color of its ear lobe. If the ear lobe is white the egg will be white, if it is red, black, or any other color besides white, it will lay a colored egg, brown, green, pink, etc.

Q 10: Why isn't there a sell by date on the UConn Poultry Farm egg packaging?

The State of Connecticut does not require a sell by date when eggs are produced and sold from the same site. The Dairy Bar is considered on site (UConn) from where they are produced, same with the dining halls. It is recommended that after the eggs spend thirty days or more in your refrigerator, you should buy fresh eggs again. Keep in mind that older eggs lend themselves well to being hard boiled. Due to the increase in size of the air cell as an egg ages, the shell peels away easily!

Q 11: Is the Dairy Bar open year-round?

Yes. Our hours of Operation are as follows:

  • Open year-round:
    Sunday-Thursday 11am-7pm
    Friday & Saturday 11am-10pm
  • Closed:
    New Year's Day
    Easter Sunday
    Memorial Day
    Independence Day
    Thanksgiving
    Christmas
    Closing at 3pm on New Year's Eve and Christmas Eve

Q 12: Can I apply to work at the Dairy Bar?

The Dairy Bar is staffed by student employees. If you are interested in finding out if there are any openings, please call 860-486-2634 for more information.

Q 13: How can I contact the Dairy Bar staff?

You can call the Dairy Bar at (860) 486-2634 or (860) 486-1021 with questions or to place orders for ice cream cakes and ice cream. You may also wish to email the manager at ethan.haggerty@uconn.edu, but please keep in mind we cannot accept emailed orders.

Q 14: How do I get to the Dairy Bar?

From Hartford - Take I-84 east/west to Exit 68 in Tolland. Travel south on Connecticut Route 195 about 6 miles to the University. (You will come to the intersection of Rt. 195 and Rt. 32 after approximately 4 miles; then the intersection of Rt. 195 and Rt. 44 - known as Mansfield Four Corners - after another 2 miles.) Proceed through the Rt. 195/44 intersection and travel approximately 1 mile to the Storrs Campus. When you approach campus there will be a traffic light at the top of the hill. Proceed through that toward the bottom of the hill. On your left just before the traffic light at the bottom of the hill, you will see a sign for the UConn Dairy Bar. Take a left at the sign into the driveway and go past the George White Building (on left) and take another left. This takes you to the back of the George White Building where the Dairy Bar and parking are located.

From Willimantic - Head north on Rt.195. When you approach campus, Mirror Lake will be on your left just after Mansfield Road. Proceed through two traffic lights. The third traffic light will be at North Eagleville Rd. (left). Just past the light, the UConn Dairy Bar sign will be on the right. Take a right into the driveway at the sign, continue past the George White Building (on left) and take another left. This takes you to the back of the George White Building where the UConn Dairy Bar and parking are located.

Our parent site, has a number of maps and directions to help you get to the Dairy Bar.

GPS:  41.813414N   72.249386W

Q 15: What is the history of the UConn Dairy Bar?

The UConn Dairy Bar, or Dairy Product Salesroom as it was originally named, opened sometime between 1953 and 1954 to sell dairy products that were manufactured by the Creamery. It was attractively decorated in the colors and style of the time; black felt-covered menu boards mounted on tan tile walls, stainless steel dipping cabinets, and a curved yellow formica countertop complete with dark green bar stools. Prior to the establishment of this retail operation, the Creamery had been used exclusively for teaching and research. A 1917 UConn Course Catalog refers to the Creamery and describes courses taught in Dairy Husbandry such as Milk Testing and Separation, Milk Production, Ice Cream Making, and Butter and Cheese Making. It moved to its new, larger quarters in the George White building in November 1998. The retail facility now features a red, white, and black color scheme, ice cream parlor-style chairs and tables, several bar stools taken from the old location, and an observation window for viewing the ice cream making process. The Animal Science building is named after George Cleveland White who served as a Professor of Dairy Husbandry at UConn from 1914 to 1944. He taught Milk Production, Cattle Judging, Animal Nutrition, and Herd Improvement classes.

The Creamery was established in the early 1900s and ceased the majority of its operations in 1991. At its peak, the Creamery employed more than 25 full-time employees, grossed over one million dollars per year, and supplied the UConn dormitories and other state agencies with daily deliveries of fluid milk, sour cream, cream cheese and ice cream. Today, the Creamery manufactures ice cream according to its original and highly popular recipe; this delicious product is sold at the UConn Dairy Bar. Also available are a variety of cheeses.

Over 200,000 customers visit the Dairy Bar annually to enjoy more than 24 flavors. Perhaps our most famous of these is Jonathan Supreme ice cream, named for the school's mascot, Jonathan the Husky Dog (vanilla ice cream swirled with peanut butter and chocolate covered peanuts). Other popular flavors are Strawberry Cheesecake, Coffee Espresso Crunch, Oreo, and Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough. The Dairy Bar is open year round and continues to enjoy long lines of devoted customers who wait to sample their favorite flavor.

Q 16: Can I tour the animal barns?

Yes! Everyone's welcome to visit UConn's animal barns. Click here for more information.

Reminder: Your pets (dogs, etc.) are not allowed in any UConn Animal Facility (including Horsebarn Hill Arena).

Q 17: What will visitors see?

Everyone is welcome to explore our animal barns and to learn more about the animals we care for. Visitors can see dairy & beef cows, sheep, and horses. The poultry barn is closed to the public. Young animals can be found in the barns at the following times of year: baby foals in June, lambs during the entire month of March, dairy calves year-round and beef calves beginning in mid March. Every day visitors can view the UConn dairy cows being milked at 1:00 p.m. and fed at 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. at the Kellogg Dairy Center.

We ask that visitors do not feed the animals because some animals are on special diets. We also ask that visitors not pet the animals due to the Rabies Alert in Connecticut.

Currently our farms house:

  • Over 200 Holstein and Jersey Cows
  • 40 Brood Ewes
  • 55 Mature Beef Cattle
  • 85 Horses
  • 1000 Poultry

Q 18: I would like to schedule a field trip to UConn and get ice cream at the Dairy Bar, what do I need to know?

Please give us a call 7 days in advance to schedule your visit, as we offer price breaks for pre-scooped cups. All that we require is that you call in a complete order.

Payment options: organizational/business check, purchase order, money order, cash, Visa, MC, and Discover (KFS accounts for UConn Departments only).

Two sizes:

  • 8 oz. one-scoop cup @ $2.50 each
  • 4 oz. child size cup @ $1.50 each

(These prices apply if order is placed 7 days in advance of visit)

Choose from any four flavors we are currently serving (be aware of any food allergies and seasonal flavors).

Q 19: Can I schedule a tour of the creamery?

We offer self-guided tours from our observation window.

Q 20: How does the Dairy Bar handle food allergens?

Each of our ice cream flavors is manufactured in a way to avoid cross-contamination with food allergens, and we perform through cleaning and sanitizing of all equipment. However, you should be aware that we do process products containing allergens, so all products are processed in a facility that contains nuts, milk, wheat, soy, etc.

In the sales area, all of our scoops go in all of the ice cream flavors and a customer must specify to their server that they have an allergy to certain foods. In this case, a clean scoop will be taken from the back and your cup will be scooped from an unopened tub that was manufactured in a way to avoid cross-contamination with food allergens. We cannot guarantee an allergen-free sundae, milkshake, cookie sandwich, ice cream soda, or ice cream float.

If you want to order an ice cream cake, please make us aware of your particular food allergen and we will certainly explain how we plan to accommodate your needs.

Q 21: Where is the UConn Co-Op?

From the Dairy Bar, go back out to Rt. 195 and take a left. At the traffic light, go right on to North Eagleville Road. Follow this road and the signs for South Parking Garage for approximately ¼ mile until you see Hillside Road and make a left onto it. Follow Hillside Road and the signs for South Parking Garage until you see the Co-Op on your right and park in the South Parking Garage. You can park for one hour in South Garage and the Co-Op will validate your parking if you make a purchase at the Co-Op of $5 or more. Just ask the cashier to stamp your receipt.

Find other Storrs campus locations on the UConn Map.

Q 22: How did the husky dog mascot get the name "Jonathan"?

The Husky became UConn's mascot in 1934, after the University's name changed from Connecticut Agricultural College to Connecticut State College, and athletic teams could no longer be called "Aggies". The Alumni Association board of directors, one of whom had found a Husky pup at a Connecticut breeder's, put the question of a mascot to a student vote, and the students voted overwhelmingly to accept the dog as the new mascot. A contest to name the mascot led to the tag Jonathan, after Connecticut's Revolutionary War-era governor, Jonathan Trumbull.